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Full IPV6 support

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7 comments

  • Avatar
    Nicholas

    On our TODO list for next year, we will also have to change all configuration fields for static IP assignment in apps. 

  • Avatar
    Seth

    IPv6 support would also be useful for direct remote access and skip any "cloud" proxy, although that opens it up to being attacked directly. Double edged sword I suppose.

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    lanbrown

    With the smallest IPv6 allowed is a /64, that is a lot of addresses for someone to scan.  That is 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 addresses that someone would need to scan to complete just a single /64 subnet.  Add in that they need to scan ports as well, that is a lot of scanning.

  • Avatar
    Ralph Becker-Szendy

    GordonL: Just out of curiosity, allow me to ask: Why do you want to use IPv6?

    I'm not questioning that once you run IPv6 on your network, you also need the RainMachine to support it.  That makes perfect sense.  It's just that what I'm seeing in networking around my workplaces is that adoption of IPv6 in the US has fundamentally stopped, and it is being abandoned.  A few years ago, we thought the world would run out of IP addresses, and as long as the idea was that every computer needs a globally addressable and unique IP address, that would have been true.  But firewalling off internal networks and NAT'ing them has made it unnecessary.  Today, most computers are on private subnets, using address for example from the 10.x and 192.168.x address ranges.  This has also caused most large computer users to return their class A networks (even IBM no longer has control of the 9... class A network), which has opened up a lot more number space.

    The only place where I personally see IPv6 in production are very large computer users who have too many machines for the 10.x network, and have to use the larger number space. I don't know about adoption in Europe and asia.  But I don't think there are very many of those super-large networks that contain RainMachines (I can't see Amazon AWS or Microsoft having RainMachines directly on its internal cloud network).

    Again, this is just my curiosity ... I'm interested in your motivation.

  • Avatar
    lanbrown

    As the cloud grows there will be more and more demands for IP's and eventually there will be no more IPv4 addresses.  When that happens, new services will be IPv6 only.

     

    Carriers have also invested into CGN for when they do run out of address space.

     

    Better to have the IPv6 capability now before it is needed.

  • Avatar
    Seth

    I bought the RainMachine for its cloud independence, and IPv6 support means I could connect to my RainMachine from any of my mobile devices without having to use proxies, port forwarding, or "stupid NAT tricks". Sure, people's workplaces may not support IPv6 since enterprise is usually slow to adopt things, but that's irrelevant. Cellular carriers like Verizon Wireless are already fully committed to IPv6 with LTE (https://www.apnic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/vzw_apnic_13462152832-2.pdf) and I get IPv6 from my ISP with prefix delegation.

  • Avatar
    Ralph Becker-Szendy

    Got it ... I didn't think about the mobile network angle.  Thank you for the explanation!

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